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Bienvenido a la Corte Superior de Napa:

Grand Jury

Grand Jury Information

The Grand Jury is a historic institution and serves an important role in our society. It is sometimes referred to as the "watchdog" of the community. It functions as an arm of the judicial branch of government and operates under the authority of the Napa Superior Court.  

Reports & Responses

Current and past reports listed by year.

Grand Jury Reports & Responses

Current Grand Jury Members

Albert Bahn, Daniel Chomko, Steven Disbrow, Elizabeth Ellsworth, James Haller, Pam M. Hewitt, Thomas M. Knoblauch, Timothy Knutson, Robert Lieber, Elizabeth Parker, Christian Philips, Mark Sherwood, Frank L. Smith Jr., Suzanne Sommer, Michael Stone (Foreperson), Richard Walloch, Neil Watter, Susan M. Wheeler, and Roy Yared

Demographics

Current and past demographic information

Eligibility

Eligibility requirements & application

Citizen Complaints

In the event you would like to bring an issue before the Napa County Grand Jury, please access and complete the form below. Do not mail your complaint to a judicial officer. Send the complaint as directed on the form. Please note your issue or inquiry remains confidential by law.

Important Dates

Term of Office

January 2021 - June 30, 2022

Recruitment Re-Open

September 22, 2020

Supplemental Recruitment Closes

October 13, 2020

Interviews

November 2020 (dates to be determined)

Swearing In

January 2021 (date to be determined)

State Training

January 2021 (dates to be determined)

Report Issued

Not later than June 30, 2022

Frequently Asked Questions

The grand jury is a historic institution and serves an important role in our society. It is sometimes referred to as the "watchdog" of the community. It functions as an arm of the judicial branch of government and operates under the authority of the Napa Superior Court. The Court is responsible for appointing 19 Napa County citizens to the grand jury each year. The term of office is July 1 to June 30.

The grand jury investigates and reports on the operations, accounts, and records of local government officers and agencies. It is a fascinating opportunity for citizens to learn about the workings of the institutions and people who govern our local affairs. Grand jurors also have the power to investigate citizen complaints about local government. The experience rewards grand jurors with the feelings that they have made their community a better place to live and have enhanced the freedoms we enjoy in this country by performing an important government service. For more information about the grand jury, click Agents of Change to view a video produced by the California Grand Jurors Association.

A grand juror serves for one year beginning on July 1. There is a significant time commitment that varies from year to year. The grand jury itself decides how often to meet and how much work to do. You will also decide for yourself when to meet and accomplish the work of the grand jury. No set schedule is forced upon you. If you are unable to continue serving for the entire year, an alternate will be appointed to replace you. The law requires each grand jury to inquire into the condition and management of the public prisons within the county and to investigate and report on the operations, accounts, and records of the officers, department, or functions of the county on a selective basis. The grand jury also has the authority to review the operations of many other local government agencies, such as cities and special districts. The grand jury decides which agencies to review each year. Grand jury meetings are confidential and cannot be discussed publicly. The Fair Political Practices Commission requires that all grand jurors file a Statement of Economic Interests Form 700.

Yes. Napa County provides training to all grand jurors. Training is currently being provided by the California State Grand Jurors Association and usually lasts two days. Support is also given to the grand jury throughout the year by the county, the Court, county counsel, and the district attorney.

Yes. Although primarily a civic responsibility, a grand juror is paid $15 and is given a mileage reimbursement for each general meeting that he/she attends. Other support services are also provided by the Court and county.

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